Creating Firewall Port Exceptions

Creating Firewall Port Exceptions

A computer firewall is software that helps secure your computer from malicious programs that might communicate over your network without your knowledge. A computer with a firewall enabled will often prevent your Virtual TimeClock Server computer from communicating with your Virtual TimeClock Client computers. 

An exception rule tells a firewall that it is okay for a program to communicate with other computers on your network. This document explains how to add exceptions to the built-in firewall on both Windows and Mac computers. See the manufacturer’s instructions if you have a 3rd party firewall installed.

Note: You should not need to modify the firewall settings on your Virtual TimeClock client computers.

Mac computers have a firewall that is turned off by default so the need for exception is less common. Follow the exception instructions at the end of this guide if your Mac server has its firewall enabled. 

Microsoft Windows computers have a built-in firewall that is turned on by default. This means you will likely need to add a firewall exception to any Windows computer when you install the Virtual TimeClock Server software for the first time.

Windows system updates from Microsoft have occasionally deleted all firewall exceptions. This results in a sudden loss of communications between your TimeClock Server and Client computers. In this case, you must once again add the firewall exceptions to your TimeClock Server computer.

Windows Firewall Exceptions

You will open a port for TCP and UDP (auto-discovery) communication. We do not recommend adding firewall exceptions by application in Windows. Add port exceptions for your version of Windows below:

Windows 10

  1. Right Click on the Start button and click Control Panel.
  2. Select Windows Firewall (or type firewall in the search box and select Windows Firewall).
  3. In the left pane, select Advanced Settings. Enter your admin password if prompted.
  4. In the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security dialog box, in the left pane, click Inbound Rules, and then in the right pane, click New Rule.
  5. Select Port and click Next.
  6. Select TCP then Specific local ports, enter 56777 and click Next.
  7. Select Allow the connection and click on Next.
  8. Leave all profiles checked on the next screen and click Next.
  9. Enter VTC TCP as the rule name and click Finish.
  10. Repeat steps 4-9 for UDP:
  • Port type = UDP 
  • Specific Local Port = 56778 
  • Rule name = VTC UDP


Windows 7 & 8

  1. Go to the Start menu and click Control Panel.
  2. Click System and Security then Windows Firewall.
  3. Click Advanced Settings in the left pane.
  4. Click Inbound Rules in the left pane and then New Rule in the right pane.
  5. The New Inbound Rule Wizard will appear.
  6. Select Port for the type of rule and click Next.
  7. Select TCP then Specific local ports and enter 56777 and click Next.
  8. Select the Allow the connection and click Next.
  9. Leave all profiles checked on the next screen and click Next.
  10. Enter “VTC TCP” as the rule name and click Finish
  11. Repeat steps 5-10 for UDP:
  • Port type = UDP 
  • Specific Local Port = 56778 
  • Rule name = VTC UDP

Windows Vista

  1. Go to the Start menu and click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Windows Firewall.
  3. Click Allow a program through Windows Firewall.
  4. On the Exceptions tab, click Add Port.
  5. Enter “VTC TCP” in the Name box.
  6. Enter 56777 in the Port number box.
  7. Select TCP for the network protocol and click OK.
  8.  Repeat steps 4-7 for the UDP port:
  • Port type = UDP 
  • Specific Local Port = 56778 
  • Rule name = VTC UDP

 

Windows XP

  1. Go to the Start menu and click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Windows Firewall.
  3. On the Exceptions tab, click Add Port.
  4. Enter VTC TCP in the Name box.
  5. Enter 56777 in the Port number box.
  6. Select TCP for the network protocol and click OK.
  7. Repeat steps 3-7 for the UDP port:
  • Port type = UDP 
  • Specific Local Port = 56778 
  • Rule name = VTC UDP


Mac Firewall Exceptions
By default, macOS allows signed software (like Virtual TimeClock) to receive incoming connections. You should not experience issues with your firewall unless this option has been disabled or incoming connections have been manually blocked. To ensure your firewall has been properly configured:

  1. Select System Preferences from the Apple menu.
  2. Click the Security or Security & Privacy icon.
  3. Select the Firewall tab.
  4. Click the lock icon in the preference pane, then enter an administrator name and password.
  5. Click the Firewall Options button (Your firewall is turned off if the button is disabled).
  6. Ensure that the option to “Automatically allow signed software to receive incoming connections” in enabled.
    Mac Firewall
  7. Verify that the Virtual TimeClock Server has not been manually blocked in the connections list. If the Server has been blocked it will show on the list with a note that incoming connections have been blocked.
  8. To unblock the server click on “Block incoming connections” and changed the setting to “Allow incoming connections”.
  9. Click OK.